Courses

Current Courses

Fall 2014

» To register for American Indian Studies courses, you can begin here: Registration Information.

» See the Registration Help Guide if you need on-line assistance.

» Learn more about the undergraduate minor or contact John McKinn.

AIS 101: Intro to American Indian Studies. Staff, TR 9:30-10:45, TR 1-2:15; McKenzie-Jones, MWF 11-11:50, MWF 1-1:50, Gilbert, TR 11-12:15

Interdisciplinary introduction surveys the stories, histories, and lands of tribal peoples who became known as "American Indians." 

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2014 for a
UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect course, and UIUC: US Minority Culture(s) course

AIS 101: Intro to American Indian Studies. Diaz MW 9:30-10:50

Interdisciplinary introduction surveys the stories, histories, and lands of tribal peoples who became known as "American Indians." 

These courses will include a comparative introduction to the geography, societies, and cultures of Oceania, including Hawai`i,.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2014 for a
UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect course, and UIUC: US Minority Culture(s) course

AIS 140: Native Religious Traditions. Gilbert, TR 2-3:55 (Discovery Course)

Interdisciplinary introduction surveys the stories, histories, and lands of tribal peoples who became known as "American Indians." 

First Year Discovery Program Course. Registration restricted to freshman.

AIS 199: Red Power Movements. McKenzie-Jones, MWF 10-10:50

Description: coming soon

AIS 277: US Native Americans to 1850. Hoxie, TR 11-12:20

Survey of the Native American experience in North America from the arrival of Europeans to 1850. Explores the impact of European expansion on Native American communities, the ways in which Native American people adapted to the growing European presence, and the continuities and innovations that distinguished the indigenous world in this era. Focuses primarily on those parts of North America that became part of the United States.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2014 for a UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect, and US Minority Culture(s) course.

AIS 285: Indigenous Thinkers. Staff, TR 12:30-1:45

An introduction to the English-language traditions of indigenous intellectuals. Specific topics vary.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2014 for a UIUC: Non-Western Cultures course , and UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect course

AIS 291: Independent Study

Supervised reading and research in American Indian Studies chosen by the student with instructor approval.

AIS 459: Topics in American Indian Literature. Warrior, TR 3:30-4:45

Interdisciplinary seminar on special and advanced topics in American Indian and Indigenous Literatures.

Same as ENGL 459. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

AIS 481: History of American Indian Education. Gilbert, TR 12:30-1:45

Students will study various efforts to "civilize" American Indians through US government initiatives and religious churches, as well as educational models developed by tribal entities following passage of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975.

Same as EPS 481. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

AIS 490/590: Fires of Memory. Harjo, Arranged

The Power of Personal Storytelling in Indigenous America Stories can be literal caches of remembering, so that dream, history, or mythic elements have a place to live until they are refreshed into being by speaking, or by reading. We will consider how earthscape, generation and individual personhood generate meaning. We will consider the power of memory, even memory as a living being. There will be two tracks through the course, one designed for undergraduates and another, more rigorous one, for graduate students. There will be a creative non-fiction writing option, or an essay option. This course will be "online," with a few scheduled on-campus meetings.

For permission to register, contact John McKinn in the American Indian Studies office.

AIS 491: Readings in American Indian Studies

Individual guidance in intensive readings in the theories and practices of the field of American Indian Studies.

AIS 503: Seminar in Indigenous Studies. DeLisle TR 12:30-1:45

Research and writing seminar that offers special topics based on current research questions and concerns in American Indian and indigenous Studies and opportunities for graduate students who have made considerable progress in defining a research project to advance the research and writing to the next stage (e.g., to include as a thesis or dissertation chapter or for publication). Topics vary.

AIS 590: New Indian History. Hoxie R 1-2:50

The "New Indian History" burst onto the scene a generation ago in response to events both inside and outside of the academy. This Native-centered approach to the indigenous past in North America has transformed the way scholars (and to some extent the general public) perceive this subject.  While the "New Indian History" remains enormously influential, it is currently being challenged and changed by new approaches that employ the frameworks of settler colonialism and transnationalism and the language of indigeneity.  This seminar will assess the contributions and limits of the New Indian History and these newer approaches to interpretations of major events and movements in American Indian history, including removal, the invasion of the Transmississippi West, and the rise of national reform movements.  The seminar will also explore the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches in understanding major themes in the Native past such as spirituality, gender, and economic change. The emphasis in the course will be on reading, debate and the charting of a new agenda for Native history.